The Need for Co-Learning in the Workplace

The need for peer to peer or co-learning is needed more than ever in places of work. Current training and development practices are just not reliable or capable on their own; this may sound odd coming from someone with a training based business!

When a group of people are learning from each other, critical advances happen in the work quality alongside the trust and transparency which then grows. Something that would not occur in a traditional learning and development format. Alongside this, the engagement and motivation levels increase. Not just in the person who is now absorbing a wealth of new information, but also through the member delivering the knowledge; the person is being used to their advantage, and that person is now feeling a sense of responsibility through empowerment.

Co-learning is not a new thing in business, people have always learnt from each other in the office. This has usually been to share best practice and specific skills which has been related to a task. However, the development of further co-learning exercises regarding skills that team members have developed from outside the workplace and not directly linked to the functions in the place of work could help increase the innovation and productivity which powers the business forward.

As a leader, you may never have asked your team members what other skills and areas of strength they are developing in their own time. It has never been business related, therefore, why would you? However, those coding skills, language skills, creative skills could be turned into transferable skills or new ways in developing a process. And what better person to deliver it, other than the team member themselves.

The sharing of knowledge and learning is a great asset, and I believe the development of co-learning opportunities in the workplace, alongside other sharing economy features, will help any leader to then get the best from the team and the task at hand.

Despite many developments in making formal training more interactive, it doesn’t meet the needs of many styles of learning. Kinaesthetic learning in particular, and, although the co-learning experience can be as equally as visual or auditory, there is a certain higher level of understanding through a personal approach that is engaging and captivating.

The transferring of skills in a workplace can be easy as getting team members to write down what they feel comfortable with and getting them to complete their skill swaps with others. Therefore, eliminating the management levels and allowing employees to feel trusted in a task which will enable them to grow with the business, thus, increasing the empowerment, intrinsic and self-development levels.

When I have helped to put this process into existing businesses, I have often advised the leaders that the content of what is learnt may seem irrelevant to the job. However, this is not a significant concern as the real power of co-learning comes from the new connections which start to form. A clear indication that strong social capital is developing, this is an essential ingredient if the business is then seeking higher innovation and productivity through team members extending internal connections which have meaning.

My YouTube video on Co-Learning

Creative Leadership and Community Building

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This blog is audio, check out the 30-minute recording which covers many key areas including:

Leadership 

Culture 

Community Building 

Listen here:

Is your business in search of high communita?

Communita is a word which you would use when there is high social capital emerging from your community. We all know that a community is when a group of people come together with a strong focus or sense of belonging which they can form from any situation, this being a social or a work setting. What then makes the community stronger and drives high engagement is the social capital which forms within it, and the spirit that comes from high social capital then creates the communita.

So what is the magic touch in creating social capital? The foundation block is that the social connections need to have to meaning. This would come from a variety of events which take place. Some excellent examples of companies which offer high social capital include Atlassian; this is a business which offers their ShipIt days as part of their commitment to employee engagement and community. The ShipIt day is a project where everyone in the business drops tools, and for 48 hours work on whatever they want to develop. Once a project or idea comes into force, they showcase them to the business.

Not all the ideas in the ShipIt days are commercially viable. However, the intended purpose of the projects is to drive social capital which then adds this extra layer onto the organisational culture which then brings in Communita. The significant thing about having a high community in a business or a social community is that it progresses the innovation and the productivity. Partly due to connections which start to form in the organisation which leads into other significant areas such as the rise of co-learning. This is an essential tool for the development and motivation of individuals and something which I believe is going to become increasingly important within the future of work and what an organisation will do to achieve high engagement.

It seems that the key to success is:

Social Capital + Communita = engagement = innovation and productivity

Co-learning is interesting as this forms high levels of communita, and often cheaper for a business to run. Having people learn from each other’s skills set rather than being taught in a formal training situation often causes more inspiration and the perfect place for social capital to form. In fact, anything based on sharing and an internal sharing economy are good for high communita. This is way many businesses looks to change their organisational culture to something which is more task and project-based and allows individuals more freedom and flexibility.

The measurable way of seeing if you have the high social capital within your organisation comes from some simple questions which you could ask your community, these include:

Name three people who you worked on a project with outside of your team?

What are the skills which five people in the office have?

Have you developed or learned from others in a natural setting?

Questions such as this would allow you to understand where your current situation is, and if you are finding that answers are short or un answered, you know that social capital needs to be increased as you need communita. It’s good to then look at the creative efforts from Atlassian and other companies to understand how you can bring this concept in place and what needs to be done. The important thing to do in this is to think both creatively and strategically!